In a Time of Universal Deceit, Telling the Truth is Revolutionary.
Thursday, January 26, 2023

Congress controls Obama’s agenda

As he starts his second 100 days as president, Barack Obama must yield much of his agenda’s fate to Congress.

His biggest proposals, such as revising health care, energy and education policies, are in the hands of lawmakers who will debate, change and possibly reject them in the coming months. Obama obviously can influence lawmakers, but he has less control over his destiny than when he was unveiling new initiatives almost daily and filling out his Cabinet.

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Obama: Waterboarding ‘is torture’

President Barack Obama called simulated drowning a form of torture on Wednesday, and defended his decision to end a practice used against terrorism suspects by the Bush administration.

Obama said the process, known as waterboarding, violated American ideals and was not appropriate even if it made getting information from suspected enemies easier.

"Waterboarding violates our ideals and our values. I do believe that it is torture," he told a news conference.

"That’s why I put an end to these practices."

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Congress endorses Obama’s budget goals

Democrats in Congress capped President Barack Obama’s 100th day in office by advancing a $3.4 trillion federal budget for next year — a third of it borrowed — that prevents Republicans from blocking his proposed trillion-dollar expansion of government-provided health care over the next decade.

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House approves expanded hate crime law

The Democratic-led U.S. House of Representatives Wednesday approved an expansion of federal "hate crime" laws — an effort that former Republican President George W. Bush had opposed.

On a vote of 249-175, the House passed and sent to the Senate a bill backed by the new Democratic White House to broaden such laws by classifying as "hate crimes" those attacks based on a victim’s sexual orientation, gender identity or mental or physical disability.

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New Hampshire moves closer to gay marriage

The upper house in New Hampshire’s assembly voted on Wednesday in favor of a bill that would make the northeastern state the fifth in the country to allow same-sex marriage, the governor said.

The bill still has to win clearance from the lower house and get the signature of Governor John Lynch.

Lynch, a Democrat, has previously opposed full, same-sex marriage, but he has not indicated whether or not he will veto the bill.

The state already recognizes same-sex civil unions.

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